These powerful lyrics from Will Smith’s ‘Tell Me Why’ is kind of relevant right now

Read THR’s Actor Roundtable over breakfast this morning and something Will Smith said about Paris reminded me about his song from way back, ‘Tell Me Why’. Responding to a question about the movie Django Unchained, he said:

We can’t look at what happens in Paris [the terrorist attacks] and want to f— somebody up for that. Violence begets violence. So I just couldn’t connect to violence being the answer. Love had to be the answer.

To this day, the first verse of ‘Tell Me Why’ is one of the saddest and most powerful that I’ve ever heard:

September 11th, I woke up about 7am, West Coast time, French toast and my
Turkey bacon, taking my time, awakin’, turning my TV on
To my surprise, saw what everybody in the world saw
Me and my children, images were chillin’
My son said, “Daddy were there people in that building?”
A cold sweat, frozen with a lump in my chest
I heard his question, couldn’t bring my lips to say “Yes” to him
That night at my son’s side, he cried and prayed
For the ones who died in the World Trade
His palms to God, seeds and qualms with God
He just kept on pressin’ me, wanna know why
Then one week later our bombs were dropped
We seein’ them on CNN, they just won’t stop
The infrared images of brutal attack
He said, “Daddy now we killin’ em back”

The first time I heard it, I wasn’t a mum yet and even then I thought that loss of innocence was so heartbreaking. Now that I have a 5yo, I feel not just for what the kid represents in the song, but also for all the kids who were/are being “killed back” in response to what happened.


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Can Justin Bieber make it cool for young people to talk about Jesus?

Justin Bieber is not the first celebrity to talk about Jesus, but he is one of the younger ones, and – like him or hate him – certainly one of the most influential. While the cynic in me did wonder how much of his interview with Complex magazine was coached, it was a stroke of PR genius nonetheless. You have to respect the guy for what he’s doing, even after everything else we’ve seen and heard from him. If this was “Mission: Rehabilitate Justin’s image”, they’ve hit the ball right out of the park.

As a Christian, I know it’s not easy to talk about your faith. I personally prefer the “show, not tell” approach, but sometimes, like in an interview, you’ve just got to come right out and say it I guess. Which is what Bieber did:

I just wanna honestly live like Jesus. Not be Jesus—I could never—I don’t want that to come across weird. He created a pretty awesome template of how to love people and how to be gracious and kind. If you believe it, he died for our sins. Sometimes when I don’t feel like doing something, but I know it’s right, I remember, I’m pretty sure Jesus didn’t feel like going to the cross and dying so that we don’t have to feel what we should have to feel. What Jesus did when he came to the cross was basically say, “You don’t have to feel any of that stuff.” We could take out all of our insecurities, we could take away all of the hurt, all the pain, all the fear, all the trauma. That doesn’t need to be there. So all this healing that you’re trying to do, it’s unnecessary. We have the greatest healer of all and his name is Jesus Christ. And he really heals. This is it. It’s time that we all share our voice. Whatever you believe. Share it. I’m at a point where I’m not going to hold this in. – Justin Bieber

For his interview with Billboard, he went to church. Stephen Colbert talked a lot about his Catholic faith when he first took over The Late Show, which was fascinating to watch and read about. I even wrote about it for my TV column. But as much as I like the guy, he’s probably not the barometer of cool the Gen Z-ers, or even the Millennials, are looking for. Which brings me to my question: can Justin Bieber make it cool for young people to talk about Jesus?

The church gets a bad rap – and many times for good reason. I believe in God and even I don’t like Christians sometimes. To speak up about your faith takes guts when you’re standing in front of the world. Not for those who already wear a “Christian” label like pastors or those in Christian music because then you’re expected to talk about God. But for people like Colbert and Bono from U2 (who I think is amazing) and now Bieber, theirs is a completely different sphere of influence, which makes it so interesting to observe.

People shouldn’t be put off by the discussion of religion or faith – and this goes for all religions. Dialogue, not ignorance, is the way forward. If there’s one thing the world needs right now, it’s a better understanding of one another, not fear of those who are different from us. I’ll be the first to admit that the Christian church has gotten pretty good at playing the “us vs. them” card, which does no one any favours.

But I digress. While I’m definitely more of a Colbert, U2 kind of person, I have to admit that there are some things even Bono cannot do. Maybe, just maybe Bieber is the tipping point the entertainment industry needs so others too will find that it’s really okay to talk about Jesus. We’ll see.


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Must watch: Misty Copeland gives Jimmy Kimmel and Guillermo a ballet lesson

I’ve been following Misty Copeland‘s story for a while, even though I’m no ballerina and don’t plan to send the kid for ballet lessons. Her truth has transcended the (often) elite and closed-off world of ballet, and she inspires me in ways perhaps I’m not even completely sure of yet. Any story about breaking boundaries, changing perceptions and smashing stereotypes is a tale worth telling. Also, this YouTube video is the funniest and best thing I’ve seen all week.


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An interview with Misty Copeland, the ballerina who’s changing not just the stage but the world

Totally meant to start on my work but I’ve been spending the past hour watching this Teen Vogue interview with Misty Copeland. The first time I heard about Misty was through this New York Times article. Since then, she’s been named one of TIME’s 100 Most Influential People and is the first dancer in a generation to be on the cover of the magazine. Success stories like these fascinate me – people who break the mould, who overcome stereotypes and adversity to show others what could be possible if they would only look beyond their carefully (and stubbornly) constructed boxes.

Misty is a soloist with the American Ballet Theatre at 32, which is a lot older than most soloists are. She started ballet at 13, which is also way, way older than when most ballerinas start. Most people, myself included, would have gone, I’m too old to ever be a ballerina, it’s too hard, let’s start looking for another dream. Not that I’ve ever aspired to be a ballerina – little known fact: my mum sent me to ballet classes when I was about 6. I lasted a month.

I don’t envy Misty because I know how incredibly, unbelievably hard she works and the sacrifices she has to make. But I do admire her, and what she’s doing is just amazing.


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The culture of celebrity, by the actor who plays King Joffrey on Game Of Thrones

I don’t often get my nerd on these days, but this great talk on the culture of celebrity by Jack Gleeson, a.k.a. King Joffrey on ‘Game of Thrones’, was a great addition to my lazy Saturday. It also brought me right back to my uni days.


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