Grit: the power of passion and perseverance

Grit = Passion + Perseverance

Growth mindset = The belief that the ability to learn is not fixed, that it can change with your effort.

I’m thinking about what I can do to cultivate grit in my 7yo. Entitlement and lack of follow through (i.e. grit) is one of the things I’m observing in kids around me – smart, talented kids. Their (our) lives are simply too comfortable, too privileged. And I have decided probably the best way I’m going to be able to teach my kid grit is to model it for her. Not tell her, but show her and do it with her. How?

Diversity isn’t just about race, it’s also about ideas

When Muslim minds aren’t challenged by “dangerous” ideas they cannot develop the sophistication needed to articulate their own.

So true, and I would argue the same for all minds, regardless of faith, ethnicity and background. Perhaps the only hopeful way forward for the world is less ignorance and a willingness to engage “the other”.

I guess that’s why I’m so interested in education; to me, it’s the key to opening up minds and broadening horizons. The ability to read and think allows you to consider other perspectives instead of always being told what to believe. Though I realise that’s my idealised notion of education, because of course people can be “educated” into becoming narrow minded bigots.

I also found this bit especially interesting because I did not know this:

This willful closed-mindedness is not an inherent feature of Islam. A thousand years ago, Muslim societies were open and curious, while Christian Europe was insular and fearful of “blasphemy.” Aristotle’s books were translated and studied in Baghdad and Córdoba, and banned in Paris and Rome. No wonder the Muslim world was then the home to groundbreaking discoveries in science, medicine and mathematics. In theology, too, Muslim thinkers like Ibn Rushd, also known as Averroës, developed sophisticated arguments that would inspire Christian thinkers like Thomas Aquinas — thanks to the Muslim engagement with Greek philosophy.

Read: How Muslim Governments Impose Ignorance

The difference between empathy and sympathy

Empathy is hard to do, and I’m almost always terrible at expressing it. I’m that person with an awkwardly timed “I’m sorry to hear that”, the one who resists the urge to find a silver lining because I know that doesn’t help but the silence is so uncomfortable! So I’m learning, and probably always will be. Also, watch Brené Brown’s TED talk on the power of vulnerability.

Penelope Trunk on the Stanford rapist and the power of language

Melissa found Louisa Curry who says, “I see a pattern emerging from rape culture where women have a past while men have potential. When women are violated we’re asked ‘What did you do to deserve this?’ and often our past is looked at for clues. When men violate women they’re asked ‘What do you have to lose?’ and their future is looked at for clues.”

I read Penelope Trunk – a lot. Here’s her piece on the Stanford rapist and the power of language. From this day onwards, through no real fault of its own, the Stanford name will be linked with the crime of an entitled white brat and his offensively arrogant/ignorant father. That’s unfortunate because, had the judge in this case done what a judge is supposed to do, i.e. see that justice is served, the Stanford name could so easily have become part of the fight against rape culture instead.